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Showing posts from May, 2020

A Walk in the Forest Primeval

Contemplating the fall of civilizations in Inwood Hill Park

At times, it feels like we’re living at the end of civilization. With the arrival of the global pandemic, many governing structures are teetering at a breaking point, one measured in graphs, curves, and waves. Whole systems like mass transit and global trade are fractured as well.


Most threatened are our social arrangements, the ones in which most of us were socialized. The norms of human interaction are shockingly in tatters these days. Just three months ago, it was normal to hang out with others in person without worrying if being in one another’s presence would cause illness or possibly death. Political and economic structures are teetering, with a critical collapse of what was once known as the public space.


It’s easy to imagine a swift evacuation of once proud cities and the future ruins. I’m haunted by 2030 visions of Midtown Manhattan, the tall concentration of skyscrapers south of Central Park. I think of busted out w…

Purposeful Pastimes in a Pandemic

The disruption of everyday life in this pandemic can lead to confusion, immobility, or a lack of concentration. I know this has been true for me. Certain activities that in normal times would be effortless and fun now seem suddenly too hard or irrelevant. For me, this includes writing anything longer than a paragraph. I also painted a small scene of the streetscape out my window but it took me over a month to finish it.


I’ve now identified a handful of activities that are easy for me, and I’ve managed to rationalize them by finding meaning in them as well. The first, of course, is walking. While staying home is the preferred course of action during a pandemic, a solitary walk in a nearby park is acceptable within the current guidelines. I find these walks in nature absolutely necessary for physical and mental wellbeing.


Taking pictures of birds can also be fun, educational, and meaningful.


While the Great Egret, Red-tailed Hawk, and Northern Cardinal are common in these parts, confirm…